Showing posts with label Minimalist running. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Minimalist running. Show all posts

Jul 20, 2013

Strengthen and Mobilize Your Feet!

I have put together a video compilation of some of my favorite mobility and strengthening exercises for the foot. The target of most of these will be for the intrinsic soft tissues of the feet but you can't fully target just one area or muscle of the body with an exercise. I didn't think of all of these ideas and I tried to give credit to those that I learned them from where I could!

These would be good for anyone with a history of ankle, lower leg or foot injuries. It doesn't matter if you wear Hoka One Ones or nothing on your feet because all of us should have strong and mobile feet. Your feet do a ton of work for you and are your main contact point with the ground. Take care of them!

Jun 11, 2013

The 10% Rule of Running: My Experience and Thoughts

Ah, the 10% rule of running for increasing mileage or run time. A very specific and objective piece of conventional wisdom handed down from each running generation to the next. Many have voiced both praise and disdain for the rule and it has even been used in some research studies.

I am currently in the process of rebuilding my running base after letting it dwindle to near zero over a 4-5 month span. I wanted to avoid doing too much too soon when I returned to running regularly and I like to experiment with ideas so I figured I would put the 10% rule to the test.

My rules for this were to run no more than 10% longer per longest run of the week or per week total. I was allowed to run less if needed and would only be running 3-4x a week. So far, after following this rule for several months I have been able to increase my total time very easily in terms of both aerobic and musculoskeletal comfort. There have been times of slight soreness but the kind you embrace or expect from a workout plan that gradually imposes increased demands or loads.

I must say that so far this base building has gone far easier than previous base building efforts. Previous attempts were plagued with issues like chronic compartment syndrome, plantar fasciosis, Achilles tendinopathy, Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome, and other common but nagging running injuries. My girlfriend has also been rebuilding her base alongside me. In the past she had a history of IT Band Syndrome/Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome issues and repeat stress fractures in high school. So far she has not had any problems arise either.

That is me in the white shirt and shorts on the far left, when I first started running. I definitely used to over-stride!

Jun 5, 2013

Three Laps and Three Cues to Better Form Running

Well, today is national running day here in the US so I hope you all get a chance to get a run in! Today's post goes back to a personal event from about three weeks ago...

I work at a small private college as a certified athletic trainer and I was covering some end of the year practices for the football team as they prepared to go on an overseas trip. Like many football fields, there was a track around the outside perimeter and the public would use this to run laps during the day and even during practice.

In the midst of a lull during practice I looked up and noticed a college-aged male running laps with form resembling that of the "Don't Be That Awkward Runner" video from YouTube. I watched him run a few laps in horror. He carried his arms completely extended and at his waist, had a major crossover gait (meaning that both feet ran on one straight line and there was no distance between potential foot prints in a medial/lateral fashion), and he was running directly on his toes without letting his heel touch the ground.

May 23, 2013

Why do you run?

I was asked a very innocent and nonchalant question the other day. The question was produced by a little small talk but in reality it was a deep question. The answer to this question has many parts or layers and many different but viable responses. I realized that the response that I would give is dependent upon time.

 I wasn’t always a runner or a fan of running. I label the younger or adolescent version of myself as the stereotypical fat or chubby kid. I dreaded the mile run for gym class in elementary school and one day I even faked sick so I could stay at home and not participate in the perceived torture.

I definitely was a stereotypical fat kid.

I didn’t get into running until my sophomore year of college when I worked with cross country and track athletes during my second clinical rotation as an athletic training student. My interests in endurance sports had begun to develop as I had taken up cycling as a recreational and fitness hobby before the start of college. I would assist my preceptor in evaluating and treating these athletes and would be amazed at the durations of their runs. I was shocked but inspired at the same time that people could run for 60-90-120 minutes without struggle and do it several times a week.

May 3, 2013

Researching the Adaptations to Running in Minimalist Shoes

I like research, especially research related to sports medicine and running. I like to read it, discuss it and implement it. Beginning this fall, I will even do some research myself for my Master's Thesis.

However, I find myself a clinician at heart and do not wish to solely do research as my career develops. Even though I have inklings of desire to get a PhD someday. Despite this, I wish I was helping conduct this research study that this article highlights.
This study out of UVA sounds very fascinating and I can't wait to see what becomes of it.


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